2017 FILMS

Oct.19 |

9:30 PM |

Princess Twin |

SATURDAY CHURCH

DRAMA MUSICAL | USA 2017 | 81 MINS. | ENGLISH

Director: Damon Cardasis

Working single mother Amara leaves her two boys at home with domineering Aunt Rose, and Rose has her eyes on the older son, Ulysses. Stealing nylons, wearing his mother’s shoes: Ulysses is just beginning to explore his identity and sexuality. When Rose demands an end to it, the boy escapes to the Village and discovers both supportive friends and the inspiration to become exactly what he is feeling inside. The problem: Rose is waiting back home. Luka Kain delivers a magnetic performance as Ulysses—who in his best moments hears music all around, and yet faces some of the worst circumstances imaginable—in this drama about finding a literal sanctum, so that you can find yourself. It’s a complicated life Ulysses leads, and Damon Cardasis’s musical coming-of-age story is all the better for tackling multiple sides of the young LGBTQ experience, with compassion and heart combined.

Content Warning: Sex work, implied sexual content, homophobia, transphobia, bullying

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Oct.20 |

7 PM |

Princess Twin |

Two Soft Things, Two Hard Things

DOCUMENTARY | CANADA 2017 | 71 MINS. | ENGLISH

Directors: Mark Kenneth Woods and Michael Yerxa

As a small group in Nunavut, Canada prepare for a seminal LGBTQ Pride celebration in the Arctic, the film explores how colonization andreligion have shamed and erased traditional Inuit beliefs about sexuality and family structure and how, 60 years later, a new generation of Inuit are actively ‘un-shaming’ their past.

Co-Presented by the Waterloo Aboriginal Education Centre

Content warning: discussions on colonialism, homophobia, transphobia, religion

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Oct.21 |

4 PM |

Faculty of Social Work Auditorium |

Major!

DOCUMENTARY | USA 2015 | 95 MINS. | ENGLISH

Director: Annalise Ophelian

MAJOR! follows the life and campaigns of Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a 73- year-old Black transgender woman who has been fighting for the rights of trans women of color for over 40 years. Miss Major’s personal story and activism for transgender civil rights, from mobile outreach and AIDS prevention to fighting the prison industrial complex, intersects LGBT struggles for justice and equality from the 1960s to today. She is a veteran of the 1969 Stonewall Rebellion and was incarcerated at Attica months after the 1971 Uprising. Most recently, Miss Major has served as the executive director of the San Francisco-based Transgender Gender Variant Intersex Justice Project (TGIJP), a grassroots organization advocating for trans women of color in and outside of prison that is led by trans women of color. Miss Major’s extraordinary life and personal story is one of resilience and celebration in a community that has been historically traumatized and marginalized. While mainstream gay rights and marriage equality dominate the headlines, Miss Major’s life is a testament to the fierce survivalism and everyday concerns of transgender women of color, who so often live in the margin of the already marginalized.

Content warning: Contains language and descriptions of police brutality, incarceration, and sexual assault.

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Oct.21 |

6 PM |

Faculty of Social Work Auditorium |

Before You Know It

DOCUMENTARY | USA 2013 | 110 MINS. | ENGLISH

Director: PJ Raval

The subjects of Before You Know It are no ordinary senior citizens. They are go-go booted bar-hoppers, love struck activists, troublemaking baton twirlers, late night Internet cruisers, seasoned renegades and bold adventurers. They are also among the estimated 2.4 million lesbian, gay and bisexual Americans over the age of 55 in the United States, many of whom face heightened levels of discrimination, neglect and exclusion. But Before is not a film about cold statistics and gloomy realities, it’s a film about generational trailblazers who have surmounted prejudice and defied expectation to form communities of strength, renewal and camaraderie—whether these communities be affable senior living facilities, lively activist enclaves or wacky queer bars brimming with glittered trinkets and colorful drag queens. Dennis is a gentle-hearted widower in his 70s who begins exploring his sexual identity and fondness for dressing in women’s clothing under the name “Dee.” Ty is an impassioned LGBT activist who hears nothing but wedding bells once gay marriage passes in New York. Robert “The Mouth” is a feisty bar owner who presses on when his neighborhood institution comes under threat. Born before the Civil Rights era, these men have witnessed unbelievable change in their lifetimes, from the Stonewall Riots and gay liberation, to the HIV/AIDS pandemic and Queer Nation, to gay marriage and Lady Gaga, and have lived to become part of an unprecedented “out” elder generation. Before focuses on the lives of these three gay seniors, but reminds us that while LGBT elders face a specific set of issues, aging and its challenges are universal. An affirmation of life and human resilience told with a refreshing humor and candor, Before confirms that you are never too old to reshape society.

Content warning: Contains descriptions of violence, homophobia and ageism

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Oct.22 |

11 AM |

Faculty of Social Work Auditorium |

Family Day Cartoons

FAMILY | SHORTS

Family friendly LGBTQ2+ short and special cartoon to be announced!

IN A HEART BEAT

Directors: Beth David and Esteban Bravo

A closeted boy runs the risk of being outed by his own heart after it pops out of his chest to chase down the boy of his dreams.

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Oct.22 |

1 PM |

APOLLO CINEMA |

THE YEAR WE THOUGHT ABOUT LOVE

DOCUMENTARY | USA |2014 | 68 MINS. | ENGLISH

Director: Ellen Brodsky

THE YEAR WE THOUGHT ABOUT LOVE goes behind the scenes of one of the oldest queer youth theaters in America, with our camera crew slipping into classrooms, kitchens, subways, and rehearsal rooms with this fearless and endearing troupe. Boston-based True Colors OUT Youth Theater transforms daily struggles into performance for social change. With wit, candor, and attitude, our cast of characters captivates audiences surprised to hear such stories in school settings. Our film introduces a transgender teenager kicked out of her house, a devout Christian challenging his church’s homophobia, and a girl who prefers to wear boys’ clothing even as she models dresses on the runway. When bombs explode outside their building, the troupe becomes even more determined to share their stories of love to help heal their city.

This year is the first year they dare to talk about love. Brave, inspiring, and funny…these are the inspiring LGBT youth that are leading us into the future.

Content warning: contains language and descriptions of death, violence, transphobia and homophobia

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Oct.22 |

4 PM |

APOLLO CINEMA |

SIGNATURE MOVE

COMEDY DRAMA| USA 2017 | 82 MINS. | ENGLISH URDU SPANISH

Director: Jennifer Reeder

SIGNATURE MOVE is a comedic and heartfelt look at modern families and the complexities of love in its many forms. Zaynab (Fawzia Mirza) is a Pakistani, Muslim lawyer living in Chicago who begins a new romance with Alma (Sari Sanchez), a confident Mexican-American woman. Zaynab’s recently widowed mother Parveen (Shabana Azmi) has moved in and spends her days watching Pakistani TV dramas while searching for a potential husband for her only daughter. Alma’s mother is a former professional Luchadora, which Zaynab finds fascinating, as she has recently taken up lucha-style wrestling with a former pro wrestler. Zaynab tries to keep her secrets from her mother, who knows more than she lets on.

Co Presented by Salaam Waterloo

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